Tag Archives: painful conditions

Massage Improves Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

FibromyalgiaTenderFibromyalgia is one of the most difficult conditions to diagnose, and treatment for the pain associated with the disorder can be even more complicated to manage. Neuromuscular disorders like fibromyalgia (What is fibromyalgia?) can manifest itself in a number of different ways, encompassing a vast array of symptoms that require personal attention and a modified treatment plan, tailored to the client’s needs. The intensity of the symptoms experienced may also vary based on the individual activity level, sleep patterns, stress levels, and immune response. Other symptoms that characterize the disorder include headaches and chronic fatigue, all of which can be triggered by physical trauma, psychological trauma and even viral infections. Also, triggers seem to be heightened by fluctuating hormone levels associated with the hypothalamus.

As physicians and researchers continue to search for concrete causes of fibromyalgia, those suffering from debilitating pain are often left with more questions than answers.  While there is much yet to learn, there has been success integrating different treatment methods to manage pain with the goal of returning normal daily function to patients. Pharmaceutical medications such as Lyrica, Cymbalta, and Savella may be prescribed by physicians to help with pain management and other symptoms, but a more holistic approach seems to be more effective. Nutrition and exercise should be a part of every treatment strategy because they can help improve quality of sleep, biochemistry and balance hormone levels. In an article written for O magazine, Dr. Oz discusses some of the different approaches to treating fibromyalgia and advocates the supplement regime recommended by Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, director of the Fibromyalgia & Fatigue Center.

Massage therapy has become increasingly popular to treat pain associated with fibromyalgia. Specifically, a 2011 study using myofascial release techniques showed improvements in sleep quality and physical function while at the same time, reducing pain and anxiety levels. While the underlying causes of fibromyalgia remain a mystery, both concrete evidence and personal testimonials continue to show that massage can help improve the symptoms associated with the disorder.

To learn more about the treatment options prescribed by Surgical Alternative to improve symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, or to integrate massage therapy into your existing treatment plan, please contact us via email, phone, or schedule appointment.

Referneces

Castro-Sanchez, A. M., Mataran-Penarrocha, G. A., Granero-Molina, J., Agualera-Manrique, G., Quesada-Rubio, J. M., & Moreno-Lorenzo, C. (2011). Benefits of Massage-Myofascial Release Therapy on Pain, Anxiety, Quality of Sleep, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. doi:10.1155/2011/561753

Oz, M.D., M. (2009, September). 4 Treatments for Fibromyalgia. O. Retrieved from http://www.oprah.com/health/Dr-Oz-Treatments-for-Fibromyalgia

Web MD. (2013, June 6). Fibromyalgia Health Center. Retrieved from WebMD.com: http://www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/guide/what-is-fibromyalgia

Surgical Alternative-Rehabilitative and Therapeutic Massage Therapy offers a combination of modalities designed to help people suffering from acute or chronic pain, return to a pain-free and active lifestyle. We can help treat pain associated with a variety of conditions including, but not limited to: degenerative discs, herniated or ruptured discs, joint pain, rheumatoid arthritis, carpel tunnel, neuritis, whiplash, muscle strains and sprains, plantar fasciitis, fibromyalgia, tendonitis, cluster headaches and migraines. In addition we also aid clients who experience pain from multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, lupus, and scoliosis.

For more information on the services we provide or for a free consultation, please contact us via the channels listed below or visit our Facebook page. Thank you for your support!

For an appointment please visit our website to use our interactive calendar feature or call us at (813) 948-6300.

Web:  http://surgicalalternative.com/

Email: info@surgicalalternative.com

Another Great Review for Surgical Alternative! Thanks Charles!

Another Online Review for Surgical Alternative!

While going through the Surgical Alternative Facebook Page last night I happen to find another review! I was so excited I just had to share it with you today!

Pam is a talented and experienced massage therapist. ….really listens to her clients concerns and works to relieve pain. I enjoyed my time there and recommend my family and friends too – Charles

Thank you so much, Charles!  At Surgical Alternative, we strive to take extra measures to relieve both their minds and their painful conditions.

We are also very happy that you recommend us to your friends and family as well.  No matter how fast technology evolves, the best way to get the word out is by word of mouth.

That is why we love reviews and recommendations so much.  The more people who know about us, the more people we can help return to an active lifestyle.  If it was not for our clients, then Surgical Alternative would not be where it is today.

So, if you have a review, please Contact Us.  We would love to here about your experience with us.  You can also place them all over the internet, we have been finding them all over the place.

The healing effect of Manual Therapy Protocol for symptoms of Fibromyalgia Syndrome!

fibromyalgia-trigger-points

Recently, research investigators have been studying the therapeutic effects of  manual therapy protocol on improving with pain and quality of life.  The study measured quality of sleep, function, pressure pain threshold, and depressive symptoms in both men and women and men with fibromyalgia syndrome.

Eighty-nine patients were randomly assigned to experimental or control group, according to an abstract published on www.pubmed.gov. The experimental group (24 female, 21 male) received 5 sessions of manual therapy and the control group (24 female, 21 male) did not receive any intervention.

Pressure pain thresholds (PPT), pain, impact of FMS symptoms, quality of sleep and depressive symptoms were assessed in both groups at baseline and after 48-hours of the last intervention in the experimental group, according to the abstract.

Here are the results:

• Manual therapy protocol was effective for improving pain intensity, widespread pressure pain sensitivity, impact of FMS symptoms, sleep quality and depressive symptoms.

• Gender differences were observed in response to treatment: women and men get similar improvements in quality of sleep and tender point count, whereas women showed a greater reduction in pain and impact of FMS symptoms than men, but men reported higher decreases in depressive symptoms and pressure hypersensitivity than women.

If you would like to read the original article, Click Here.

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How come Grandma can “FEEL” a storm coming?

storm-headache

The next time you watch the weather forecast, notice the barometric pressure. Numbers such as 30.04 will be followed by “rising,” “falling,” or “steady.” Typically, when a low pressure front is coming, it signals not only a change in the weather, but a drop in the barometric pressure, which is pressure against the Earth’s atmosphere. Remember when Grandma would say, “Rain’s coming, and I can feel it in my joints?” She actually knew this because of what happens to our bodies when the barometric pressure changes.

That means that the pressure against your body drops as well, and your joints and areas that are injured can begin to swell. This swelling causes increased inflammation, and we require hormones to deal with this increased activity in our bodies. Increased use of these hormones can cause them to deplete.

We have, nestled atop each kidney, a small gland that produces both adrenaline and cortisone. These two hormones help us with energy, mood, immune function, pain management and the famous “Flight or Fight” response. The steroid cortisone is fundamental in managing pain, immune function and energy. When cortisone levels drop, pain level and illness increase. Adrenaline is famous for energy and strength.

Did you ever notice how your cold or pain gets worse at night? That’s because our bodies slow production of both adrenaline and cortisone in the evening so we can go to sleep. It’s part of our circadian rhythm. The downside is the fact that we don’t have these hormones that help us feel better, either. So, our cough gets worse, and our pain goes through the roof.

Something similar happens when a storm is coming. Did you ever know someone who could “smell” snow or rain before it came? What they “smell” is a change in the electrical charge in the air. It’s been described as a “metallic” smell. All atoms have either a positive or negative charge so they can bind to form molecules. As the barometer falls, the positive charge, or “ions” increase which causes a depletion of cortisone in the body. This happens to all creatures that have adrenal glands—in other words, all mammals.

People who are chronically stressed either physically or emotionally may experience weather changes more acutely. The elderly will experience it more acutely as well, as their bodies don’t have the ability to overcome these changes as easily as they did when they were younger. Because of our dependency on caffeine, we drink another cup of coffee, eat chocolate or sip tea in order to suppress fatigue that signals a drop in pressure, but don’t understand why our knees hurt more. There’s only so much cortisone produced daily unless we take medicines or drugs that increase this steroid. Unfortunately, doing so, on a chronic basis, can kill you. Think about the athletes who have died of chronic steroid use after their heart gives out.

So what can we do to manage this, aside from moving to southern California? Well, depending on the problem, whether it is pain, mood, or energy, there may be a solution. If the problem is simply energy, then we are warned to stay away from simple carbohydrates such as sugar, starches, and junk food. Eat foods that will sustain you and not bring the “crash” you feel after that morning doughnut. Don’t assume that caffeine is the answer, either. Consult a nutritionist if you need to come up with ideas for controlling simple energy problems.

Chronic pain, chronic fatigue and depression all present unique challenges. They all can be affected by nutrition, exercise, sunlight and barometric pressure, as well as by chemical imbalances. It is not a good idea to self-diagnose and self-treat when there may be medical problems causing these fluctuations in mood, energy and pain. But once diagnosed by a professional, there are things that we can do to improve our response to the environment.

Chronic pain can respond to pain management techniques. To be effective, though, these techniques require daily practice. Choices include relaxation or hypnosis techniques, biofeedback, acupuncture, acupressure, Reiki, massage, chiropractic, and aquatherapy. You may have to try several before you find one that you like and that works well for you.

Chronic fatigue still is poorly understood, although it can have a profound effect on mood. Diet, particularly the avoidance of carbohydrates, can help.

Depression has been described as a “chemical imbalance” but that is only part of the story. There are theories of genetics or the environment, such as family influence, prenatal care, or biohazard exposure. It also can be a manifestation of electrical problems in the brain, and that can be treated with neurofeedback. But the barometric pressure can have a profound effect on mood as well. How we interpret changes in our mood will have major effects on the mood itself. For instance, if we interpret a simple burst of adrenaline as anxiety, then we may have a panic attack. If we are tired from a long week, we can see this as depression rather than a body that just needs a rest.

Can Grandma predict the weather? Yes, sometimes she can, especially if she has arthritis or bursitis. Most of us don’t need a sophisticated meteorologist’s maps and predictions to know if we are hurting. But perhaps we can take measures to diminish the impact that an impending storm may have on us. We can eat properly, exercise, avoid the negative effects of drugs or alcohol, and use pain management techniques to control the chronic pain. Beware, however, of rebound pain that we can experience the day after “extra” doses of pain meds, whether they are for a bad back, joint or muscle pain, or a headache. The pain often can be as bad or worse the next day because of withdrawal from the medicines taken the day before.

Consult a professional about your mood, pain, or energy. Help can be simply a phone call away. You can check on the Internet as well. For chronic pain, Google the type of pain you have and look at professional websites such as The American Chronic Pain Association or The American Council for Headache Education. For more information about neurofeedback, visit www.eeginfo.com.

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